Monday, May 4, 2020

Day 89 - Bowie, AZ

Right around now, I should have been back in Alaska at least for a bit. Some things I need to get done. But this whole pandemic has really thrown a wrench into the works. The current plan is to fly back as soon as Alaska get’s rid of the 14-day quarantine requirement. The rumor is somewhere around the latter half of the month. We’ll see.

This morning, I messed around with the awning that caused us problems yesterday. It turns out that if the material is completely flat, the awning rolls up properly. I guess, I was in a hurry when I last rolled up the awning and one side had a couple of inches of awning folded over. It caused it to roll up crooked.

The other project For the day was the non-functional Hobbs meter (hour meter) for the generator. I plugged in my small 12V booster and the meter worked just fine. The wiring from the meter runs through the Magnum auto gen-start module so that is the next place I need to look. Fortunately, we do have the manual for the gen-start module. The annoying thing is that we really have no idea how many hours the generator actually has on it. When we purchased the RV, I just assumed that the Hobbs meter was working and the displayed run time was accurate.

Later that day - Success! From the auto gen-start manual, I figured out that the installation was completely botched by whomever installed the module. The original +12VDC signal wire from the generator to the Hobbs meter was connected to the negative terminal of the meter and the positive terminal went to the “Stop” terminal of the gen-start module. I removed the connection to the module and made a new ground wire for the meter and swapped the signal wire to the positive terminal. It now works fine. The neighbor here at the RV park is probably wondering why I had started the generator. The auto gen-start module still doesn’t work properly and I’ll address that some other time. Maybe in cooler weather. BTW, enabling the gen-start function on the Magnum remote just causes the generator to start. It’s supposed to start based on interior temperature or battery voltage. I’m not sure where the temperature sensor is since the wiring just disappears into the wiring harness.

The disappointing thing is that someone probably paid a dealer somewhere a ton of money to install this module. From the wiring (crimp on connectors and Scotch-Loks), it wasn’t from the factory.

5 comments:

david R said...

Not just dealers, even RV factories occasiosnally do slipshod work. I've learned to take a close look at breaker panel, transfer box and etc to make sure connections are tight with no insulation under the clamp. Bare crimps with dual wall shrink tube are my fav. Death to worthless scotch-loks. Keep digging, eventually you'll get it sorted. Temp supposed to be 70 this weekend. If weather is nice we're flying to Anc and back on Wed. Things are starting to loosen up which I agree with, so I hope we don't regret it. Some areas like NYC are horrible but other areas not. Hope we get to visit when you're here.

Lynne Goebeler said...

Good deal you are able and willing to take on challenges such as this, it seems there is something to deal with in an RV at least monthly, doesn't it? Jerry has been great about doing the same, and having the manuals (we have a briefcase full) is really helpful.

RichardM said...

I’ve run into numerous examples of really sloppy work. Hopefully the windshield repair works out...

RichardM said...

More than monthly. We have a list of things that need addressing.

The incompetence really bugs me...

david R said...

Replaced clearance lite bulbs recently with LEDs. One refused to light up, found the lower clearance lites use an open at the bottom wire nut-looking crimp. And wires are corroded. Eventually I'll have to replace them all... Odd combination of superb construction and good materials and then sloppy work and crap materials. The boat was the same story but its gone now. Cee's Cardinal fortunately does not share this malady.