Thursday, April 11, 2013

Worn Out Studs



Wednesday Evening - Just as I figured, the screw-in tire studs have worn down again on the rear tire aka the pusher. It only takes about ten minutes to remove and re-install the 52 studs using my 1/4" impact driver and the cost for the 52 studs is about $4. Not bad for being able to ride through the winter though the studs are starting to wear out faster due to more dry pavement.


Aerostitch has screw-in carbide tire studs of a more conventional design listed in their catalogue and I will be trying those next winter. The front tire still has the ones I put in a couple of months ago. Right now, we have fresh snow on top of ice and that is a treacherous mix. At times it's hard to stay upright even while walking.

Thursday Morning - The replaced studs made a huge difference not only in getting up the driveway but made for a much more solid feel on the road. This may be the coldest I've ridden the rig in so far. As always, with the heated liner and gloves it's no problem at all staying toasty warm though I could really start feeling the cold after arriving on campus. With the engine basically just off idle through campus, I turn off all the heated gear to avoid running the battery down.

I must admit that when I first woke up this morning and saw -18°F, I seriously considered taking the bus. But it was only -3°F at our house so I went ahead and rode in. 

16 comments:

  1. Richard:

    it's funny that you mention heated gear. I would presume that being in AK it would be essential equipment. I seldom use mine but then we only ride down to the low 30"s°F but during our iMBC2010 when it was 100°F in Bend I used my heated grips because 65°F felt really cold. I don't think charging systems put out enough amps until you are up to around 3K rpm's, so I would only use them on the highway and not in town

    You made the right decision to convert to a Hack. Look at how much longer your riding season is now

    bob
    Riding the Wet Coast

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    1. No, not in the essential category. I've had mine for less than a year and was convinced by ChrisL when he came through last May. In fact there was a rider who came through a month or so ago and rode his GS all the way to Prudhoe Bay and didn't have any heated gear. He didn't want to have to rely on his bike running to stay warm. There is a lot of common sense in that statement. For the same reason, snow machine riders don't use heated gear. If something breaks down you want to stay warm.

      I do like my longer riding season.

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    2. I, too, think there is a lot of common sense in not wanting to rely on the bike for heat. I love my heated grips, but carry heavy gloves just in case. Of course, it doesn't get all that cold here anyway.

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    3. Being able to stay warm without the engine running is very important if you are in the back country. Less important if you are near civilization.

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  2. It looks like I'll have to look int a side car for one of my bikes... I'd love to ride all season long! The only thing I'd worry about down here would be the use of all the salt/chemicals they use on the roads. I think they would be really hard on things. I know Chris has had some electrical issues with his Ural, maybe salt spray related?

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    1. I think you just need the right bike and sidecar. There was a shop in PA that had a Ural sidecar that was "painted" with bedliner. Body, frame, everything. I think someone got tired of dealing with rust. A simple, old bike would be perfect to pull it around. With your shop, you could just wash it down every so often.

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  3. Dear Richard:

    I cannot imagine riding in -3ยบ(F)without heated gear. I only got to use mine for one season, before things changed for me. But I delighted in the snug feeling of the jacket and gloves. However, if I was going to go around in serious cold, I would still be wearing polypropolene underwear and have a real jacket and gloves in a bag on the side.

    I think you get a more challenging riding season than most. Your name made a special list on my blog today. Thanks for everything.

    Fondest regards,
    Jack/reep
    Twisted Roads

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    1. Before I got the sidecar, the coldest I've ever ridden was 15°F and that was before I had any heated gear. Last May, I rode to Anchorage and it was right around freezing and snowing and that was a pretty cold trip. This was just after ChrisL visited and raved about the wonders of heated gear. In Anchorage before returning, I picked up a liner and haven't looked back. It really does feel wonderful to be instantly warm. Since then, gloves were added. Now, it can be -20°F and I'm toasty warm on my rides, in fact, much warmer than when I drive or riding the bus.

      Thank you for inclusion on the special list, does that mean I'll get more spam? ;-}

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  4. I can't imagine riding when it is that cold, but you seem to handle it well.

    I am surprised at how quick you can change all those studs. I would think it would take a few hours. You're quick!.

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    1. With the impact driver it is literally under 10 seconds to remove and replace each one. Though it still feels weird to be putting screws into the tire....

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  5. Dang Richard, you beat my cold weather riding best with -15F, though only by one degree....

    Looking forward to meeting up with you later on this month....

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    1. Looking forward to meeting you as well. The coldest I've been out riding so far has been -22°F and the engine had problems running. I still haven't put on the silicone heat pads and procrastinated since I thought that the cold weather was behind us. Maybe it's a weekend project....

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  6. Whew...that is cold. Both you and Dom are hearty souls. As you've said though, you get used to the winter temps in your area. :)

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    1. That said, I lived in hot weather for 25 years and never got used to it. You could always turn up the heated liner or grips but I haven't seen the cooling liner yet...

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  7. Richard do you think this winter has been longer & harder than previous? You my friend are truly a Moto master because you are a hearty soul, most of us would be putting our bikes away for a long winters nap. I think I want a sidecar and it would be awesome and very versatile.

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    1. It seems a little bit longer than normal but normally, the roads were never clear enough to ride until late April/early May. So this year isn't too different. I remember getting dumped on with snow in the middle of May.

      The sidecar has really enabled me to get out and about. I'd recommend it though it drives completely different than a bike.

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