Wednesday, April 22, 2015

Too Long?

Even less moto content than usual in this post.

I skipped the longevity awards ceremony at the university system office that was held yesterday afternoon. It was a choice between that and a board meeting. The board meeting won. Anyway, they dropped off my awards this afternoon. The first was this engraved plastic thing that is required somehow by the IRS and the second was a painting that I was allowed to choose. The painting is called "Wild Lake - Looking South" by Lynn Larson. Wild Lake is on the south side of the Brooks Range just outside of the boundary of Gates of the Arctic National Park. I've never been there but have always wanted to go hiking in the area.

I do wonder how thirty years could have gone by without being laid off, asked to leave or fired...



BTW, from the FrogzSkin installation on the air cleaner housing, the CHT are back down to left-350°F right-325°F right about where they should be. These are OAT corrected temperatures. Still waiting for rain or snow...

20 comments:

David Masse said...

Richard, the most powerful motivational tool employers have is recognition. It's much more effective than money. Yet it's so seldom doled out, you'd think it was a precious commodity.

The plaque is nice (it took me a while to figure out, against the wood grain it looked like a weird tray, nice touch of social commentary in the composition) if a little trite. The painting, on the other hand, is really nice. You should hike out there and find the viewpoint if it's possible.

As to how thirty years slipped by, it's amazing how that happens.

Canajun said...

30 years. I expect the possibility of working for the same employer for that length of time is pretty much gone for the next generation. Not sure if that's good or bad, but that sort of longevity and loyalty (both ways) is increasingly hard to find. Any way, you're done (or soon will be) so enjoy your last few days of gainful employment and then look forward to having some real fun!

RichardM said...

I was asked several times why I skipped the longevity ceremony. I guess that the number of employees that reach 30 years is rather small. In my case I don't know if its loyalty, longevity or just pure laziness. Not willing to put in the effort to look elsewhere. The university is a comfortable place for me. I don't agree with a lot of what goes on but have been given the freedom to pursue a variety of things over the years.

I will probably continue on a part time basis working on the Barrow project.

RichardM said...

You're right that recognition is doled out sparingly and I'm not really sure why. There has been a procedure on the books for performance based bonuses but it is very rarely used. I'm not sure if it's due to ignorance or lack of desire.

I really like the oil painting and the artist had a several from the Gates of the Arctic National Park. Someplace very few people visit...

SonjaM said...

Not sure whether to give congrats or condolences ;-) Your loyalty certainly speaks for you!

Today's labour force however is mostly hired on short term contracts (yes, also in Germany), and the company doesn't give a rat's ass about loyalty. They want to get you cheap and get rid of you after one or two years of squeezing your knowledge out of you - that is if you let them.

I haven't found the ideal employer yet, where I would want to stay for the rest of my work life. I guess your were very lucky with yours.

Anyway, I get bored too easily, so I am happy and content to continue working on contract terms.

RichardM said...

I have been asked several times over the years "when am I going to get a real job?". By their definition "real job" = "working for a company that needs to make a profit". I guess the assumption that anyone working for government, academia or other non-profit doesn't do real work or need to justify why they should still be employed on a continuous basis.

I get bored easily as well but the university has allowed to explore new things or areas on an almost continuous basis. I really can't complain.

David Masse said...

The corporate world in many places is a cold heartless place. I guess that's the law of averages, if you live in a place with a cold unforgiving climate, you get to work in a place with a heart.

Then there's the exception that proves that rule, because I think Michael enjoys a warm climate and a decent work environment.

Trobairitz said...

30 Years, a milestone in this day and age to be sure.

And Happy Birthday too!!

RichardM said...

The current budget problems that the state is going through is demonstrating to a lot of people that the university does not necessarily have a heart. Things are different now than they were 20-30 years ago.

RichardM said...

Thank you. Milestone and birthday together. Not good...

Learning to Golf said...

Me, not being in the seeking approval crowd, would have skipped the Awards Ceremony, also.

Having been a plumber where a long term job was 9 months to a year, 30 years is a lifetime. Then in teaching I spent 17 years in the same District, split between 4 schools. I applaud your milestone and sticking it out.

VStar Lady said...

Happy birthday Richard. That's way more important than accolades (though 30 years is nothing to scoff at.) We are a fortunate few who work in an environment that encourages reaching for challenges and life long learning. It's hard to get bored.

RichardM said...

Thank you, there are some here who stayed around for forty years in before retiring. That's real dedication. Not me...

RichardM said...

Thank you...

That was a good description of the university environment for my first 20 years. Not so much recently...

Coop a.k.a. Coopdway said...

Happy Birthday Richard! All the best with your upcoming time away from your 30 years of service.

RichardM said...

Thank you. Still going to be involved in some of the activities such as Barrow.

Conchscooter said...

I am glad retirement will see you riding. I like my government job, working for someone who makes 3 times what I make not 300, proper benefits and paid overtime. I don't think I have enough patience to put in 30 years as I'd prefer to quit before I'm 76 but I am glad I will be able to if I need to. I feel lucky to have my job after a lifetime spent trying to avoid noisomne things like careers- and we still have social security in the Lower 48! For which I am grateful.

redlegsrides said...

Formal Congrats RichardM....kind of weird that the plaque is something required by the tax man but then again, its the government.

RichardM said...

At least the hope is more riding. Except for a few months working for the electric coop, just about my entire work history from ~19 years old has been within the public sector. I think I've put in the minimum number of years for SS but I don't think I am going to get anything out of the system.

RichardM said...

He mentioned that the plastic plaque was required for it to be an award or else they couldn't give me the painting. Or something like that...

But thank you. Soon, everyday will be Saturday except Sunday...