Wednesday, January 16, 2013

TIP - Day 3


http://traumwerk.stanford.edu:3455/engineeringfutures/228?view=print
This morning keynote was given by Ian Foster, the "father or grid computing" and by extension, the current hot topic, cloud computing. Many people may be familiar with Moore's Law which has been acurately describing the growth of computing power since the mid-60's but there are some other similar graphs describing the expansion of data in some other fields such as high energy physics, genomic research and astonomy that dwarf Moore's Law.

Much of the afternoon was spent in the IPv6 working group which in this case was a joint meeting with APAN and Internet2. APAN had presentations from China, Japan and Malasia. This is a snapshot of the meeting room we were assigned for the meeting. After the mid-afternoon break, there was one presentation buy DREN which outlined his challenges in setting up an IPv6 only management network. This is an upcoming federal procurement requirement and he just wanted to see what worked and what didn't. Very enlightening.

This evening, there was a reception sponsored by Brocade. It was a good opportunity to meet some new people as well as continue some conversations that were begun earlier in the day. This event was held at the Moana Surfrider which is a much fancier hotel across the street from the Sheraton. And it was right on the beach. The food was pretty standard hotel hors d'oeuvre and not bad but nothing really stood out as spectacular.

I was planning on taking some photos of the sunset but the sun went down so quickly, I kind of missed it. This was a shot through the bushes separating the reception area from the beach. The sun must drop straight down as it was dark within minutes after this picture was taken.
The mountain peak in the background is Diamond Head giving a slightly different view. After the reception were two more meetings which lasted until almost 11:00pm. It was a long day.

6 comments:

BeemerGirl said...

Very long day indeed. Did you learn something, and have fun doing it though? :)

The sun got wet, of course it got dark fast. hehe

Trobairitz said...

You still managed to capture a little of the sunset.

It sounds funny, but when we moved to Oregon it seemed to get darker faster to us. We were used to living in Penticton in a steep valley so when the sun went behind the mountain by 3-4 pm you had hours before darkness came. Not so much here by sea level.

RichardM said...

I think at the lower latitudes, the angle that the sun rises and sets is a lot steeper. Shalllower angles give longer sunrises and sunsets. Here dawn and dusk is short where in Alaska is really long.

RichardM said...

All work but someones got to do it.....

I never considered that the sun got wet and the fire went out. We didn't cover that in school. Obviously, you went to a better school ;-)

SonjaM said...

Had to LOL at the first comment. You get to learn something new every day ;-)

Looks like you had a long and hopefully successful day. I bet with all the work involved you will be happy to return into the calmness off your deep frozen world.

RichardM said...

Yep, once I learn one new thing my day is complete and I can stop;-)

These technical meetings are incredibly useful to learn how others in the research/education community solve familiar problems. Alaska and Hawaii share some of the same problems being so disconnected from the rest of the country. The advantage Hawaii has is that it is on the way to many other places. Alaska is sort of the end of the road. Maybe after te polar ce melts, there may be more options....

Still have a couple more days but they will be more focused on a single topic, IPv6.