Thursday, June 15, 2017

Day 41

This morning, we took the campground shuttle to the south entrance of Zion National Park in the town of Springdale. We walked across the bridge to the pedestrian entrance to the park when I realized that I had left my drivers license and the park pass back at the trailer. We mentioned it to the park service employee and she waved us through without it reminding us to treat it like cash. We then got in line for the Zion shuttle bus. It was a 40 minute wait.

The shuttle bus is the only way to access the really scenic trails in the park and we took the shuttle to its last stop. We walked up the river trail until the beginning of the Narrows where you need to cross the river. The trail continues in the river itself. We opted to turn around at this point. Two of the most well known hikes in Zion are the Narrows and Angel's Landing.

It was very cool at this time of day as the trail was on the south side of the east-west canyon. Today's forecast was for high 90s by mid-afternoon. Not a good time to be hiking. There were a lot of people on the trail with their rented shoes, neoprene socks and shoulder high walking sticks. Supposedly to be able to feel for deep holes as you are walking in the river.

Here is where we turned around. A lot of people but the bus driver said that this was nothing compared to Memorial Day weekend. The line of hikers here and on Angel's Landing was continuous. We did not venture up Angel's Landing as it was a strenuous hike with a lot of elevation gain and hiking on rocks holding onto a chain. The pictures show thousand foot drops on both sides of the trail in places. Some other time...

We walked the short hike up to Weeping Rock where there was a continual drops of water coming out of the sandstone cliffs. We got back on the shuttle after lunch and stopped at the Human History Museum. This is the view from the back deck showing, from left to right, the Temple, the Sundial and the Altar of Sacrifice. In case you haven't guessed, all of the features were named by Mormon settlers including the park name, Zion.

Another picture looking up-canyon as we are waiting for the shuttle bus. You never need to wait long as they are spaced out 5-10 minutes apart. We went to the park visitor's center but there wasn't much there besides the gift shop. I expected some displays or something. Anyway, we showed up early for the return trip to the RV park on the shuttle.

Added on Friday. According to Wikipedia, this is the view from Angel's Landing. The view may be worth the hike...


12 comments:

  1. I can't imagine what would be needed to convince me to walk a trail with 1,000 foot drops on either side with only my sweaty palms holding a greasy chain to keep me from death's door.

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    1. This is the view of Zion Canyon from Angel's Landing. https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/10/Zion_angels_landing_view.jpg

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  2. Richard, I did a fair amount of Zion exploration back when shuttle bus visiting was something only imagined. I'm very glad that the park is as busy as it is.

    Thanks for taking me back there.

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    1. The crowds were not unexpected. Spring and Fall would be a much nicer time to visit.

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  3. In 92 when I visited the first time there was no shuttle service, at least I can't recall having been on one, and very few people around. The times they are a changin'.

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    1. When I was last here there was no shuttle bus or crowds. Things do change.

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  4. I skipped the bus portion of Zion when I rode through years ago....all that hiking....

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    1. But the views... This was the first time when I actually looked around Zion. Every other time it was just somewhere on the way to Bryce Canyon.

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  5. We skipped hiking Angel's landing too, but that view might convince me to do It! 😁

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    1. We ran into a couple at Cedar Breaks that said the view was worth the hike.

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  6. Beautiful. But did you say "rented shoes"?? I'm wondering if the bus is to reduce the need for larger parking areas. Noticing here that hiking trailheads are getting busier and cars are parking further afield. Ruining more shoulders along roadways.

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    1. Yes, people rent shoes to walk in the water. That way they don't ruin their own shoes or boots. There are so many people that the shuttles are essential.

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