Sunday, November 19, 2017

Progressive IMS

Believe it or not but this was completely unplanned. The Progressive International Motorcycle Show (IMS) was at the Long Beach Convention center this weekend. I thought about attending on Friday but ended up going on Saturday. It was a pretty big setup with most manufacturers having large booths with a lot of bikes to try on for size. Harley was the only manufactuer with huge clamps on the front wheels to keep the bikes from tipping over. BMW had several of the new 310 cc models that are rumored to be available. The GS version was about as tall as the G650GS. I also tried out the Suzuki 250 V-Strom (I hadn't heard anything about that) and several Honda small bikes.

There were a number of show bikes including this shiny sidecar rig. Most of the show bikes were too odd to even be considered "cool" at least in my opinion, but maybe that’s my age showing. The Ural was sort of represented at the show by the Ventura dealer having four rigs there with a small selection of accessories on display. They were a lot of people interested in their offerings but kind of put off by the price and lack of performance. Maybe this wasn't the right crowd.

This rig was the very first bike you saw when entering the hall. There was a modest sized vintage display and this was part of it. Scooters were represented in the vintage display as well as by Honda and Vespa. Plus some huge scooters by BMW and some Italian brands that I didn't recognize.

This bike sporting chains was also in the vintage section surrounded by a bunch of people claiming that it was all for show as it was impossible to ride in the snow. Who was I to argue with them in their leather regalia.

I enjoyed the IMS as it was an opportunity to try out a lot of bikes for size. I've heard a lot about the CSC bikes but have never seen one "in person". And like just about every other bike there except the Grom, I was on tiptoes when I tried it out for size. I’m impressed with the CSC. They seem as well finished as anything else on the floor for a fraction of the price.

12 comments:

SonjaM said...

Funny and strange to see more and more of the smaller cc bikes popping up on the North American market, Richard. It's a bit like the tiny house movement, only with motorcycles ;-) Smaller can be better, too.

redlegsrides said...

It's always interesting to hear the opinions of "experts" who you know are clueless.....am sure those guys in their regalia don't venture out when temperatures dip below 50F.

Geoff James said...

Some interesting machines there Richard and like the US, NZ seems to be getting an increasing number of small capacity bikes. I sympathise with your comments about being on tiptoe as a high percentage of bikes on the market are beyond my comfort zone too, especially as I age! I can see myself going to a Bonneville in the next year or so for that very reason.

RichardM said...

It’s interesting to see the smaller displacement bikes though based on my observation at the show, more people seem infatuated with the huge and/or fast bikes. It was never a problem trying out the smaller bikes as there was rarely any other people looking at them.

RichardM said...

It was pretty nice out but the number of bikes in the bike parking area seemed low relative to the number of attendees.

RichardM said...

So many tall bikes out there but maybe that’s part of the attraction of the cruisers. The Bonneville is a nice looking bike but it is still heavier than what I’m looking for.

VStar Lady said...

Richard, you want to talk inseam challenged ... I wrote the book. I am intrigued with your observations of smaller displacement bikes (though even the 650 bmw seems to outstretch me.) I am planning on heading to Toronto for the Bike Show this January and I'll be looking for some of the bikes you mentioned. (Thanks for the heads up!)

david R said...

Note that BMW is offering several models with lowered suspension. Cee found that she can flat foot them and I expect that will be her next bike. Wonder when the other manufacturers will catch on.
The chained rear tire was for hill climb not snow and ice. Very common for hill climb events to see chains back in the day.

Trobairitz said...

I'm still jealous Richard since the Long beach show is the only one on the west coast in the US, and I think it is the first of the season and largest of them all.

Maybe we'll have to go to the Vancouver show in January and they can tease us about what isn't available in the USA again.

What did you think of the BMW 310 GS? I am curious about that one and how it compares to the Versys (besides a smaller fuel tank)

RichardM said...

I was surprised at the number of smaller displacement bikes but equally surprised at how tall they were.

RichardM said...

I looked all over for a Versus but there was not one in the booth. I think that you have a rare bike.

I like the appearance of the 310 GS. It had tubeless tires, a somewhat soft suspension. Overall size was about the same as the G650GS.

RichardM said...

One of the bikes I am looking at locally is a G650GS with a lowered suspension. I just thought the comment was kind of humorous. When I looked at the stretched out rear the first thing I thought about were the crazy hill climbing bikes but I hadn’t known about using drive chains as tire chains.